SportsTurf

June 2017

SportsTurf provides current, practical and technical content on issues relevant to sports turf managers, including facilities managers. Most readers are athletic field managers from the professional level through parks and recreation, universities.

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50 SportsTurf | June 2017 www.sportsturfonline.com Fertilizing in summer Q: What kind of fertilizer program should I be using during the summer? A: Fertilizer is applied to fields in the summer to prevent nitrogen (N) deficiency, to suppress leaf senescence during periods of high temperatures, to promote some growth for recovery (especially if fields are in use), to help turf tolerate traffic, to prevent stress (certain diseases) and to maintain turf color. However, because the grass is not growing as quickly, you will apply less in the summer than in the spring or fall. Fertilizer is also a key component during seed or sod establishment. Though summer establishment is less than ideal, constant use of fields means that renovations are ongoing throughout the season. The proper procedure for a renovation program would be to have the soil tested for nutrient status and pH, and to make corrections where necessary. A starter fertilizer that contains phosphorus is applied to the soil surface at time of seeding. A recommended rate would be no more than 1 lb. N/1,000 sq.ft. and at least 1 lb. P/1,000 sq.ft. at the time of planting. It is important that the N level is not too high, to prevent turf burn/injury to new seedlings. There are four key concepts to nutrient stewardship that take into consideration all of the benefits that fertilizer provides and at the same time offer some guidelines on how we apply them to maximize plant growth and recovery but do so in an environmentally responsible way. Adopting these principals is a good idea, especially if you are going to seek Environmental Facility Certification through STMA. These four concepts Continued on page 49 15 385 lbs. 7.7 467 lbs. 9.3 432 lbs. 8.6 534 lbs 10.7 18 320 6.4 389 7.8 360 7.2 445 8.9 19 303 6.1 368 7.4 341 6.8 421 8.4 20 288 5.8 350 7.0 324 6.5 400 8.0 21 274 5.5 333 6.7 308 6.2 381 7.6 24 240 4.8 292 5.8 270 5.4 334 6.7 25 230 4.6 280 5.6 259 5.2 320 6.4 27 213 4.3 259 5.2 240 4.8 296 5.9 29 199 4.0 242 4.8 224 4.5 276 5.5 30 192 3.8 233 4.7 216 4.3 266 5.3 32 180 3.6 219 4.4 203 4.0 250 5.0 34 169 3.4 206 4.1 191 3.8 235 4.7 35 165 3.3 200 4.0 185 3.7 229 4.6 40 144 2.9 175 3.5 162 3.2 200 4.0 46 125 2.5 152 3.0 141 2.8 174 3.5 Nitrogen Analysis (e.g.15-0-0) Regulation size: 360ft x 160ft (57,600f2) # of 50lb Bags Typical Size with Sidelines & Outer areas (70,000ft2) # of 50lb Bags Regulation size: 360ft x 180ft (64,800ft2) # of 50lb Bags Typical size with sidelines and outer areas (80,000ft2) # of 50lb Bags Analysis (%) American Football Soccer Table 1: Fertilizer Product Needed for Football and Soccer Fields @ 1lb Nitrogen per 1,000 Square Foot. Questions? Send them to 202 Kottman Hall, 2001 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210 or sherratt.1@osu.edu Or, send your question to Grady Miller at North Carolina State University, Box 7620, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620, or email grady_miller@ncsu.edu Q&A with Pamela Sherratt

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